Friday, April 27, 2007

Ooh, lookee, the NYT noticed us!

There's an article in Today's NYT about how much there is to do here in El Triángulo, expecially if you have a bunch of brats in tow: North Carolina’s Triangle: Nature, Culture and Barbecue. But the first sentence is retarded: "THE Mayberry-meets-M.I.T. appeal of the Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill region of North Carolina ..."

Mayberry? Did the writer actually come here or did she just read about us on a website? There's really no "Mayberry" flava left in the Triangle ... unless maybe you count Pittsboro, which doesn't get a mention in the article. And I'm so tired of hearing how great Foster's is. Frankly, I find the place to be overrated and annoying, full of people who would trip their own grandmothers to score a table when the place is crowded. In fact, all the restaurants the writer listed (Lilly's Pizza, Foster's, Mama Dip's and Crook's Corner) are exactly the same ones that always get listed by everyone ... did the writer even bother to research any of the new and really exciting places in the area? (Not that I ever eat at any of them, but still ...) And although we're allegedly famous for our barbecue, or at least famous enough for it to be mentioned in the lede paragraph, the writer doesn't bother to list an actual barbecue joint (maybe that's because Eastern N.C.-style barbecue is actually quite heinous).

But woo! The Festival For The Eno is is "like a giant backyard barbecue for the creative class." Maybe that's why I've never had any fun at it.

But to end on a good note, at least she didn't call us "Raleigh-Durham."

6 comments:

Sarah said...

I never have fun at the Eno festival either. It seems like a giant arts-and-crafts shopping mall, plus music I don't like, plus fair food. Except no mini donuts -- if they had that I would go.

To be fair I haven't been to the Eno festival in years, for the reasons above. It might be totally different now. It just kinda doesn't seem worth my time to find out.

Lisa B. said...

That's exactly my impression of it, plus it's always really, really hot. I haven't been in a few years either. I almost went the year that Flaco Jimenez played at it, but then I decided that it wasn't worth putting up with the annoying part just to see Flaco.

B.M., BFA said...

C'mon, what's not to love about a bunch of passive-aggressive hippies packed asses-to-elbows in 100 degree heat? Just don't trip on someone's banjo or camping barc-o-lounger, or you'll get an earful.

The posters for the fest are definitely the best part.

georg said...

Even if it was a festival for BRIAN Eno, I wouldn't want to stand around outside in 100+ degree heat...

elsacapuntas said...

WHAT?! Georg, I thought I knew thee...

Personally, I like to imagine the Eno on the Eno festival as Brian E. wafting down the River E. in moonlight, wearing a white sequened caftan and singing to the quietly watching crowds on shore like some kind of angronenous, glam messiah.

Barry Ragin said...

It was absolutely worth going to the Eno Festival to see Flaco.

It's not an event i plan my summer around, but if i'm in town, there's always someone i want to see on at least one day.

A few years back it was Ralph Stanley. First year i was in town it was Loudon Wainwright.

Plus, it's for a really good cause. ERA has done as much to preserve the quality of life we take for granted in Durham as nearly anybody.